1121Boiler MACT: Some Background and how it affects your Business

Most owners of industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers understand the basics of the EPA standards – known Boiler MACT (maximum-achievable control technology) – regarding the emissions emanating from boilers. However, the rules are not necessarily as straight forward as they would appear to be. And of course only by having a detailed understanding of the standards can companies hope to come into compliance with said rules. With that in mind, we would like to refresh you on some history and information about Boiler MACT.

What is Boiler MACT?

 

Boiler MACT is the EPA’s National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants as they relate to industrial, commercial and institutional boilers. They do not apply to residential boilers and hot water heaters. The “Boiler MACT Rule” was issued in January 2013 and since then many facilities have sought to come into compliance with the regulations. (Facilities affected by the rules were required to come into full compliance with the rules by January 31, 2016. However, the EPA can grant a one-year extension to facilities requiring additional time to comply.) Because our business is helping you to come into compliance regarding industrial emissions, we are well aware of the regulations.

Background/History of Boiler MACT

 

Back in February of 2004 NESHAP, also known as the “Industrial Boiler MACT Rule” – was finalized by the EPA. However, due to a U.S. Court of Appeals ruling in 2007, the EPA was required to rewrite the rule. During the back and forth process of designing the regulations the EPA received nearly 5,000 comments on the proposed rules and was asked to extend the final promulgation deadline until 2012. This request was denied.

 

Cems-experts can help you remain in compliance with the Boiler MACT rule by renting you reliable equipment that can monitor for CO2, etc. We carry CEMS rentals such as NOx/O2 systems for turbines and boilers. These test for exotic gases such as NH3 (Ammonia), HCl, H2S, THCs, etc. as well as Opacity Monitors (COMS) ensuring that you remain in compliance with the EPA.